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Howard Galganov is still an idiot

Hey, remember Howard Galganov? He’s that anglo-rights crusader who was popular back in the 90s, ran for office a bunch of times (and lost) and eventually gave up on our province and moved to Ontario.

Well, Howard doesn’t let silly provincial boundaries stop him from opining, which he does now through his website. His latest diatribe talks about the declining anglophone population in Quebec, and he blames it on what’s clearly the most logical source: the anglophone media. (Except The Suburban and CIQC.)

His diatribe is long and venom-filled with overuse of the words “sell-out”, “racist” and other insults, so I’ll boil down his arguments:

  1. They wanted to be nice. Their refusal to let slip the dogs of war and stab at government with their pens was surely a missed opportunity.
  2. They didn’t support “anglo rights leaders”. Translation: They didn’t support me. As if the leaders deserve support regardless of whether their positions are sound.
  3. They’re like Jews who supported the Nazis. Nothing quite like a Holocaust simile to get a point across when everything else fails.
  4. Some say we should celebrate Bill 101’s anniversary. That’s simplifying the issue a bit. The Gazette’s opinion, for example, is that Bill 101 was a compromise that ensured linguistic peace. And even then, it also carried an opinion piece from Robert Libman saying it was devastating to the anglo community. CFCF’s Barry Wilson certainly hasn’t strayed from the anglo rights beat, and CBC doesn’t really have an opinion section.
  5. They called me “Angryphone”. That’s because you’re always angry.
  6. They equated me with francophone terrorists. Really? Has anyone called you a terrorist? You’re a radical on one side, just like Impératif Français are radicals on the other side. You may disagree with where the middle is supposed to be, but that’s something you have to live with.
  7. They didn’t sponsor rallies to raise money for lawsuits against the government. Is that really the role of the media? They raise money for literacy, but they tend to take a back seat to, you know, actually trying to change the law.
  8. They never said ethnocentric nationalism is wrong. I don’t see it that way. They routinely make the point of saying that the anglo and immigrant communities are important to Quebec. They were pretty united against the stupidity in Herouxville.

Galganov’s solution to the problem is simple and stupid: Have all the anglos and immigrants leave, shut down tourism and watch as their economy self-destructs.

Howard doesn’t seem to understand the problem. It’s not that Quebec doesn’t understand the value of its English-speaking citizens, though they do take us for granted. It’s that many anglophones are leaving the province because they can’t be bothered to learn some French.

In other words, the problem is people like Howard Galganov.

2,210 thoughts on “Howard Galganov is still an idiot

  1. rob brown

    OOPS. I mean JACQUES and MARC,

    Let me see if I understand the Quebec education law:

    In Quebec, English people can go to English or French school at the taxpayer’s expense. But French people are not allowed to attend English school at the taxpayer’s expense. So, in an ironic twist of idealism, the Quebec government is actually discriminating against French people in terms of education.

    Does this sound right?

    Sincerely,
    Rob Brown
    CAB

    Reply
    1. Jean Naimard

      It’s funny, eh, that the english never gives a shit about what happens to the french, **EXCEPT** when it’s something that can be used to have them disappear by becoming english…

      One ought to think that they only thing the english want is no more french…

      Reply
      1. Westerner

        Odd, your comment Mr. Namaird,

        No where else in Canada exist laws of discrimination agaisnt language of education, commercial signage etc etc (provisions of 101) but in Quebec.

        You then you come up with the illogical statement that english people are discirminating agains the french.

        Makes no sense as in reality in Quebec it is clearly the reverse.

        Reply
    2. rob brown

      MARC and MR. NAIMARD,

      What is the definition of “discrimination”? It means treating different classes of people differently. Whether it is “viewed” as discrimination is not the point. The fact is that it is discrimination. And that is only with regards to education. Now let’s talk about commercial signs.

      Reply
  2. James Wolfe

    Where did the money go for Canada day celebrations in the past? Well you know how things work in Kebec. Da money was found in Shawinigate, brown paper envelopes, Da cash was handed out to all sorts of buddies of Jean, and Gilles, we, weee.You scratch my back and I scratch yours, Dat is how we do tings here in kebec.It is Da norm, for me, you know, a proof is a proof, is a proof is a proof. JC.…”

    Quebec has no intention of leaving Canada, why when you can have complete control of Quebec and use the rest of the country as your own personal bank machine, any time you want? “Ya, we’ll ban the English language and culture in Quebec, (bill 22, 178, 101…), we’ll force the rest of the country to fund whatever we demand (bilingualism, really just a hiring quota for the french), we’ve got the best of both words. Yippy, I love those poor suckers outside Quebec; they have no idea what we are doing with the billions they funnel to us yearly.”

    What are they really up to? “First Quebec, then we take over the rest of the country, one step at a time…through bilingualism…” PT, “How to take over a country through bilingualism…” SD. That’s what’s really going on. Wake up, people!

    Reply
  3. Westerner

    “There is no double standard, WE Quebec taxpayers foot the bill for Canadians from across the country who come to Quebec to take advantage of lower university tuition that WE the Quebec Taxpayer subsidise.”

    People from outside of Quebec who come for university at McGill or Concordia do not receive the lower tuition rates enjoyed by those in Quebec. This is know to be true from first hand experience. Interstingly, though some exchange student from France can achieve the low tuition rates but not other Canadians. I wonder if France sends 8.5 Billion to Quebec every year?

    “Finally , public and most private english schools in Quebec get Quebec taxpayer subsidies and must abide by the rules.”

    Yes, the rules of discrimination against those wishing to school their children in English (francos and immigrants)

    “Can you say the same”

    Yes and publically funded for either french or english with no discrimination in funding of either system. Unlike Quebec, where some (francos, allos) are being forced to pay out of their pockets for an english education. As a matter of fact those in the french system where I am from are given bussing and after school events which the english schools do not enjoy.

    Please do not try and defend Quebec’s language discrimination in education. You cannot win the argument as the bias is very clear as exhbited by bill 101 and soon to be bill 103. Intersting point that the drop out rate of the english system is quite a bit lower than the french system.

    Reply
  4. Jean Naimard

    Why would anyone want to have it’s children educated in english in Québec? To cut them off from the french society there and have them as outcasts?

    Or is anyone implying that french education is somewhat inferior? How so, then?

    Reply
    1. Thomas Kirke, The Nation's Capital

      I must compliment M. Naimard on his June 26 contribution. It was one of his few postings that made some sense and I enjoyed reading the comments. Nevertheless it has a some factual errors which need to be addressed.

      I had challenged M. Naimard to define his allegiance, which tends to bound disconcertingly back and forth between the French and the First Nations.

      In his June 26 posting M. Naimard revealed that “I never denied my native blood. I just wish I had a bit more so I’d be more handsome, though.”

      He also indicated that he was on the Mohawk’s side during the Oka Crisis, and even got behind the police/army lines using a Bulletin Board System.

      M. Naimard summed up the feelings of many onlookers when he described the Mayor of Oka as “a huge, humonguous, giant douchebag.”

      The attitudes of the Oka mayor and council and most aspects of this pivotal event in Canadian History can be seen in the documentary Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (The Oka Crisis) (1993), a must-see for every Canadian. http://www.archive.org/details/kanehsatake

      I must take exception to the accuracy of some of M. Naimard’s statements, though. Contrary to his assertion that “the baveux (Robert Bokassa” was “the most hated prime minister ever)”, Premier Robert Bourassa was in fact the Premier of Quebec.

      M. Naimard posits that Bourassa pursued hydroelectric development “following the Québec policy towards the natives: dealing with them as a nation, not a bunch of retarded kids like the federal government does.”

      Actually the First Nations found out about the hydroelectric development when surveyors showed up on their lands and told them what was going to happen. There was no consultation with the First Nations prior to construction.

      I found a valuable resource by J. Anthony Long and Anthony Little Bear called “The Quest For Justice: Aboriginal Peoples and Aboriginal Rights.”

      Rather that treat them “like a nation,” as M. Naimard would have us believe, Long and Little Bear noted that “Lawyers for the provincial government…argued during the James Bay court proceedings that the Cree and Inuit had no rights in Northern Quebec.” (p. 268)

      After three months of testimony by over 150 Cree and Inuit witnesses who described the impact of the proposed James Bay development on their way of life, Mr. Justice Robert Malouf ordered construction to cease on Nov. 15, 1973. The project was stopped and hundreds of workers were sent home. Aboriginal rights to the land had been recognized!

      However, a week later the Malouf decision was overturned a week later by the Quebec Court of Appeal, and construction resumed.

      Author John A. Price noted that the Malouf decision and its reversal provided the impetus the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA) in 1975. Price notes that “Compensation of $225 million was divided between the Cree and Inuit according to population and paid over 25 years.” http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004098

      M. Namaird would have us believe that the Cree were the sole beneficiaries of the economic compensation regarding the hydro projects, and that the Inuit were not affected. He wrote that the hydro development resulted in “a hefty compensation package that makes the Québec crees (no inuit were affected, ô ignoramus maximus) the envy of all other nations.”

      M. Naimard’s insults are, as usual, aimed in the wrong direction. The Inuit were signatories to the JBNQA and received financial compensation. Charlie Watt, an Inuit hunter, led the Inuit delegation at the JBNQA negotiations. He was a key figure in the development of Makivik Corpoation, which distributed the JBNQA funding to the Inuit communities.
      http://www.makivik.org/en/history/jbnqa

      In 1984 Mr. Watt was appointed to the Senate of Canada. http://www.parl.gc.ca/common/senmemb/senate/isenator_det.asp?senator_id=103&sortord=N&Language=E&M=M

      The Inuit village of Kuujjuarapik was located at the mouth of the Great Whale River (Grande Rivière de la Baleine). Fearing the impact of planned large-scale hydroelectric works on the Great Whale River the Inuit decided to relocate to a new village called Umiujaq about 99 miles to the north.

      M. Naimard, contrary to your assertions, the Inuit were indeed affected by the hydro projects and received compensation. It is you who have earned the title “ô ignoramus maximus.”

      I congratulate you on defining your native ancestry for your self and for this forum. My initial challenge remains, though. “M. Naimard, get your act together. Either stand in defence of your First Nations homelands, or leave Canada and go back to France.”

      Regards,

      T. Kirke,
      Canadian.

      Reply
      1. Thomas Kirke, The Nation's Capital

        Trailer Parc Marc writes on June 26, 1010, “It’s not viewed as discrimination because and English education isn’t seen as a fundamental right.”
        ——————————————————————-

        Don’t forget that the trailer park constitution must comply with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Section 23 of the Canadian Charter is titled “Minority Language Educational Rights.” A brief survey of the relevant section is as follows…

        LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION / Continuity of language instruction / Application where numbers warrant.

        23. (1) Citizens of Canada…have the right to have their children receive primary and secondary school instruction in that language in that province.

        (2) Citizens of Canada of whom any child has received or is receiving primary or secondary school instruction in English or French in Canada, have the right to have all their children receive primary and secondary language instruction in the same language.

        (3) The right of citizens of Canada under subsections (1) and (2) to have their children receive primary and secondary school instruction in the language of the English or French linguistic minority population of a province

        (a) applies wherever in the province the number of children of citizens who have such a right is sufficient to warrant the provision to them out of public funds of minority language instruction; and

        (b) includes, where the number of those children so warrants, the right to have them receive that instruction in minority language educational facilities provided out of public funds.

        So you see, Marc, English language instruction is on par with French-language instruction as far as Charter protection.

        Your assertion that it is not discrimination to deny English education rights in Quebec because “English education isn’t seen as a fundamental right” is ludicrous, juvenile, and inaccurate.

        Good thing it is written down in the Charter so tin-pot potentates like you don’t ride roughshod over the rights of Anglophones in Quebec.

        You should start checking facts instead of watching reruns of Trailer Park Boys and playing video games. Have a nice Canada Day!

        Cheers,

        T. Kirke,
        Canadian.

        Reply
        1. Marc

          You should start checking facts instead of watching reruns of Trailer Park Boys and playing video games. Have a nice Canada Day!

          I find it odd that you seem to know more about me than I know about myself. Do you have some sort of super power or something? Or maybe you have a damn good pusher? If the latter is true, let me know becuase I’d love to get my hands on that stuff.

          How are the God Save The Queen recitals going?

          Reply
          1. Thomas Kirke, The Nation's Capital

            Trailer Parc Marc…

            No superpowers here, I just deduced certain facts from your postings. Glad to see I was right!

            Didn’t realize you were such a fan of the British Monarchy! I would imagine that the rehearsals for “God Save the Queen” are going full speed in anticipation of the Royal Visit.

            The Queen was in Halifax yesterday, and she will be in Canada for over a week. The weather was a bit dodgy in Halifax and grounded the Snowbirds, but there seemed to be some recitals going on. Here is a news clip on the Halifax visit.
            http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Video+Queen+visit+Canada/3213029/story.html

            The Globe and Mail published a full schedule of her itinerary. It can be seen at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/highlights-of-the-queens-visit-to-canada/article1620844/

            She’ll be in Ottawa on Canada Day, and it will be absolutely packed on the Hill. There is normally a very large crowd at Parliament, but it will be more crowded than usual because our Monarch will be there. I might try for a glimpse myself.

            Hopefully those dreadful Quebecers who disrupted the Toronto G-20 Summit will be protesting in Montreal and won’t be anywhere near the proceedings.

            There is speculation that she may announce the new Governor General on Canada Day. We need a break from Michael Jean and her Separatist Husband.

            Have a Happy Canada Day!

            T. Kirke,
            Canadian.

            Reply
          2. Jean Naimard

            There is speculation that she may announce the new Governor General on Canada Day. We need a break from Michael Jean and her Separatist Husband.

            Yeah, let’s have another proud montrealer for governor general: William Shatner!

            Reply
        2. Marc

          23. (1) Citizens of Canada…have the right to have their children receive primary and secondary school instruction in that language in that province.

          Seems you’re not aware of Section 59. Go read it.

          Reply
        3. Jean Naimard

          So you see, Marc, English language instruction is on par with French-language instruction as far as Charter protection.

          And this is why the “notwithstanding clause” was included at the instigation of western provinces who wanted it so they could continue to discriminate against the french.
          So your “minority language education” clauses are all just more bollocks, old chap.

          Reply
      2. Jean Naimard

        The liberal party of Québec does not speak for the nation of Québec, and it certainly did not in the early 1970’s.

        When I say that Québec deals with the natives as nation-to-nation, I am not talking about the liberal party of Québec.

        It is René-Lévesque’s Parti-Québécois’ government who instituted the nation-to-nation policy.

        As it happens, the early 70’s P.Q. platform was against hydroelectric development, but rather nuclear-oriented, a sensible choice as nuclear power is the most ecological power generation system (a choice that has been taken by France, where more than 75% of power is nuclear).

        (Before anyone starts ranting against french nuclear, let it be known that anglo-saxons have always refused that France be a nuclear power — witness the Greenpeace protests of french nuclear tests, but they certainly don’t protest any of the american nor soviet tests back then).

        Reply
  5. Thomas Kirke, The Nation's Capital

    Esteemed Panelists…

    Naimard likes to babble on about the busloads of Canadians who traveled to Quebec during the 1995 referendum. On Oct. 1995 a rally of approx. 100,000 Canadians met at the Place de Canada in downtown Montreal for what was called “The Unity Rally.”

    Naimard and others of his ilk portray the Unity Rally as interference by the forces of Federalism. At least those Canadians were peaceful and there were no disruptions or violence.

    In contrast, a group of Quebecers known as the Anti-Capitalist Convergence recently paid a visit to Toronto to disrupt the G-20 Summit. The police cracked down and arrested a bunch of them.

    A Sunday, June 27 Globe and Mail article describing the arrests stated that “Most appeared to speak French as a first language, and police confirmed some were from Montreal.” http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/g8-g20/toronto/562-arrested-in-toronto-g20-raids/article1620135/

    An article published Tuesday revealed that some of the arrested Quebecers are accusing the police of racial profiling. The Anti-Capitalist Convergence organized 450 protesters who went by bus to Toronto from Montreal, but only 125 returned. Ontario, Yours to Discover!

    The group had one document on its website saying “Let’s attack the G20.” When asked about the activities of the Black Bloc, which included setting police cruisers on fire and smashing storefronts, Anti-Capitalist Conversion spokesman Mathieu Francoeur, said “For us that’s not violence. It’s a form of expression.”

    Francis Dupuis-Déri, a political science professor at the University of Quebec at Montreal, said that “Montreal is recognized as a dynamic milieu for the anarchist movement in North America.”

    The article is in today’s Globe and Mail, and this is the link. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/g8-g20/news/montreal-protest-organizers-accuse-g20-police-of-profiling-against-quebeckers/article1622392/?cmpid=rss1&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheGlobeAndMail-Front+(The+Globe+and+Mail+-+Latest+News)

    All these Quebecers should get the due process of law. In New France they would have been judged guilty unless they proved themselves to be innocent. In Canada we use the idea of Habeus Corpus from the Magna Carta and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

    If found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, they should be fined heavily and jailed where necessary. It seems that they had a premeditated effort to disrupt the Summit and should be dealt with accordingly.

    The arrests and imprisonment of these activists should have some interesting political fallout. There is a protest against the arrests and detentions scheduled in Montreal on Canada Day.

    I’ll be on Parliament Hill wearing a maple leaf and cheering on the Queen and the PM.

    Have a Happy Canada Day!

    T. Kirke,
    Canadian.

    Reply
    1. Jean Naimard

      So? Québec is the vanguard when it comes to social services and progressive ideas.

      If it weren’t for Québec, Canada would be socially as ass-backwards as the U.S. is, and, in fact, would be quite indistinguishable from the U.S., except for having no guns and having the queen.

      Québec always has been the port-side anchor preventing Canada from drifting to the right.

      Reply
      1. rob brown

        Ummmmm.. Mr. Naimard,

        You say: “If it weren’t for Québec, Canada would be socially as ass-backwards as the U.S. is, and, in fact, would be quite indistinguishable from the U.S.”

        You mean Quebec has become the home of discrimination and this certainly does make it distinguishable from the U.S. where discrimination was outlawed decades ago.

        Rob. CAB

        Reply
    2. Becks

      Mr. Kirke…I tend to disagree with Mr. Naimard on almost everything, especially his views on Quebec, language,canada, et al., however this latest little “rant” by you is a total distraction and red-herring from the original subject matter . Lame sir, very, very lame.

      Reply
  6. Ronald, ottawa

    Mr. Brown what do think of the police arresting innocent people that were not part of the protest and were arrested without just cause how does it feel to live in a police state?.

    I told you many times that there is know such thing as freedom of expression and rights, because those things exist only for the rich and not the average person.
    Also you Anglos love the queen so much this visit of hers will cost us all 1 billion and more just to have this English sponger suck the money out of us and you talk about Quebec please give me a break. Harper wasted tons of money on his little meetings to impress and show off in front of the world and while many Canadians across this rich country?, are sleeping in shelters and under bridges and so forth, imagine this money could of help thousands of people with proper shelter and even food what a waste of tax payers money. Harper is the biggest jerk in this country and for people to shake is hand makes me sick and proves to me that the Canadian public is very stupid.

    Reply
    1. rob brown

      HI RON,

      Please don’t put words in my mouth. How do you know that I “love the queen”. Why do you refer to me as “you Anglos”. Do you actually believe that all “Anglos” are the same?

      Anyway, I believe that rights and freedoms are something we must fight for, which is why I keep fighting for them. However, smashing windows, burning police cars, and fire-bombing banks and recruitment centres will only give the government further excuses to spend our hard earned billions on “security”. And, as you say, it is security for themselves, not for us.

      Sincerely,
      Rob Brown

      Reply
  7. rob brown

    Mr. Naimard,

    You say: “One ought to think that they only thing the english want is no more french…”

    These are you words, not mine. What we have always been saying is that people should have a choice of language to educate their kids in. For the Quebec government to provide education in one language to some people but not others, is discrimination.

    Sincerely,
    Rob Brown
    CAB.

    Reply
  8. Westerner

    “So? Québec is the vanguard when it comes to social services and progressive ideas.”

    No problem when Quebec has others to pay for it. What happens when Quebec has to pay for it by themselves.

    “Québec always has been the port-side anchor preventing Canada from drifting to the right”

    AKA, a ball and chain.

    That being said I rather like Quebec, spent the last week there with some friends.

    Now you have a good day Jean, and don’t forget your blood pressure medicine.

    Reply
  9. rob brown

    So fight against Quebec…

    The province where “language police” have become more important than freedom for the average citizen. The freedom to post signs in any language, and to educate their children in the language of their choice.

    Stand up against discrimination in Quebec, before discrimination spreads to the rest of Canada.

    Sincerely,
    Rob Brown
    CAB.

    Reply
  10. Westerner

    “Stand up against discrimination in Quebec, before discrimination spreads to the rest of Canada.”

    Too late, started about 40 years ago with the OLA and the unnecessary practice of making the knowledge of french a prerequisite for federal civil service positions in areas where there is absolutely no requirement. The left wing do-gooders in Canada will eventually wreck the country with a total lack of common sense.

    Reply
    1. rob brown

      Hi Westerner,

      Unfortunately, you are right. The Canadian civil service has been damaged by official bilingualism. People are hired by language, not by competence. We have seen a steady decline in the the quality of the civil service and a steady increase in the cost since the introduction of official bilingualism.

      But there are still other areas we can fight, such as “sign laws”. These are now spreading out of Quebec into Eastern Ontario. This is something to be stopped before industry and commerce are damaged as they have been in Quebec. Before Ontario becomes a “have not” province as well. Of course, the first thing to do here is to get rid of the McGuinty government because they are busy adopting official bilingualism in the provincial government as well, as well as pushing it on municipal governments.

      Sincerely,
      Rob Brown.

      Reply
  11. Ronald, ottawa

    Mr. Brown

    With all do respect the police went way too far and arrested many people that were not involve in the protest and many of you talk against Quebec and it’s language laws please give me break. Why are none of you screaming against police brutality or the injustice that has happen against poor people of this province?

    Reply
    1. rob brown

      HI RON,

      This blog is about Howard Galganov being an “idiot”. My role on this blog is to support Mr. Galganov as one of the greatest fighters for our freedom, particularly with regards to freedom of expression. As such, I believe that people have the right to express themselves and to educate themselves in any language they choose. Unfortunately, the government of Quebec does not agree with this.

      With regards to the “police brutality” at the G20 which you mentioned. It is possible that the police over-reacted in some cases. But, I believe this was a reaction to people smashing windows and burning cars. Do you think people should have the right to smash windows and burn cars?

      Sincerely,
      Rob Brown.

      Reply
  12. James Wolfe

    In that there is constant pressure to rewrite our history – to pacify the cranky Province of Quebec and the french outside Quebec – a major reason we lost the Red Ensign in the first place – we must do what we can to protect and preserve our history. A history that is under constant attack. Very few Canadians are aware that we now have portraits in our parliament of French Kings – who had nothing to do with the building of Canada- the statue of General James Wolfe no longer overlooks the Plains of Abraham, the only statue in Quebec City is of the losing General, Montcalm. There are statues of three French generals but no statues of the victorious generals at the Valiant’s memorial in Ottawa. That’s right, no General Wolfe, no General Amherst… This historical revisionism is going on right under the noses of the Governments we elect – and they remain silent!

    “First Quebec, then the rest of the country, one step at a time…” How ? What are they really up to? “First Quebec, then we take over the rest of the country, one step at a time…through bilingualism…” PT, “How to take over a country through bilingualism…” SD. How ? First comes the right to communicate with gov’t in a minority language (ie French),then comes bilingualism, then comes the right to work in the language of choice(ie French), then comes a bilingual boss,(ie French) then comes a exclusively French department and on it goes until its all French. Its happening all over the country…That’s what’s really going on. Wake up, people! Quebec, where the English, Scottish, Irish, United Empire Loyalists… built up the province of Kebec (original native spelling) since 1763. Yes, the same province of Kebec where the Union Jack and Red Ensign flew until 1950. Again, just the facts…This lie, this hoax, this revisionist nonsense that Quebec is a French province and that Canada is bilingual is just that, an outright lie. Fact: We have been part of the British Empire since 1763.We were officially an English speaking country for over 200 years, again just the facts. Almost 1 million people have been forced out of the province of Kebec due to this type of hatred/lie/spin… While all this is going on in Quebec they are forcing the French language outside Quebec in every province. Everything and anything the French demand they are getting across this entire country. They call it bilingualism (another lie never clearly defined on purpose). What are they really up to? “First Quebec, then we take over the rest of the country, one step at a time…through bilingualism…” PT, “How to take over a country through bilingualism…” SD. That’s what’s really going on. Wake up, people! Ask yourself a simple question. Why are we not teaching our real BNA history? Why are we not teaching our proud UEL history in our schools any longer?

    “Loyal She Began, Loyal She Remains.” Go learn our proud, real BNA and UEL history. These were the builders of our country since 1763. Not this phony, revisionist lie, this bilingual, multicultural, 2 founding nations, linguistic duality lie, propaganda, spin that we’ve been living with since Trudeau, and kebec forced this upon the nation. We’ve been part of the British Empire since 1763 and officially an English speaking country for over 200 years…just a fact. Wake up people, your country is in deep trouble and NO English speaking politician is telling you the truth, is exposing what is really going on. Not one politician has the decency, the honesty to expose the truth, to speak the truth, how pathetic. Poor Canada, what a mess.

    Reply
  13. rob brown

    MR. WOLFE,

    Thanks for your enlightened post on historical revisionism. It is fortunate that some Canadians understand and remember the truth. I have circulated your article to our mailing list. Another thing that is being quickly forgotten is how Britain, Canada, the U.S., Australia, and allies “saved France’s bacon” twice during the last century. Once in 1914 and again in 1939. Now there’s one for the history books.

    Sincerely,
    Rob Brown
    CAB

    Reply
  14. Thomas Kirke

    Howard Gaglanov and his co-appellant Serge Brisson have hired a lawyer for a second run at the bylaw requiring all new business signs in the township to be in both French and English.

    Superior Court Justice Monique Métivier dismissed the legal challenges led by Galganov and Brisson and ordered the two men to compensate the township for its legal bills.

    Justice Métivier ruled the bylaw did not violate the two men’s rights, and reflected “a proper exercise of power by the township” in its effort “to advance linguistic equality in Russell, where a linguistically vulnerable francophone population resides. Métivier concluded that “the bylaw is a response to a substantial and pressing need.” Right.

    It seems to me that Mr. Galganov and Mr. Brisson were not given a neutral judgement. They are basing their appeal on the grounds that Madame Justice Métivier is a Francophone sympathizer and not an impartial abitrator. Our hopes are with Mr. Galganov in his appeal. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/22092010/71/central-english-language-activists-file-appeal-against-ruling-favour-russell.html

    Hey, how about that MacLean’s issue about Quebec being Canada’s most corrupt province? This was discussed very thoroughly on this forum and I’m glad to see that MacLean’s has covered it as well. http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/09/24/the-most-corrupt-province/#idc-cover

    Cheers,

    Thomas Kirke,
    Canadian.

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