Montreal Geography Trivia No. 14

6, 10, 24, 28: What do these numbers indicate?

(Hey, it rhymes!)

OK, OK, a small hint: You have to look left and right for the answer.

Still nothing? Hint #2: Look at a map of Montreal. You can’t miss it.

No? Another hint: It’s among the most visible of Montreal’s landmarks. (Or perhaps it’s “land”marks?)

UPDATE (March 3): Time’s up.

Runways

6, 10, 24 and 28 are the numbers that indicate runways at Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

Runways at airports are numbered based on the direction a plane must be pointed in to take off or land on it, rounded to the nearest 10 degrees. So Runway 28 would be a takeoff or landing at 280 degrees, or almost due west. If the plane was using the same runway in the opposite direction, the runway would be designated Runway 10. Each runway’s two numbers therefore have a difference of 18, or 180 degrees.

Because its two longer runways are parallel, they are designated “left” and “right” depending on the pilot’s point of view (so 6L is 24R and 6R is 24L).

It’s the most visible landmark (airmark?) in the city. How could you have missed it?

15 thoughts on “Montreal Geography Trivia No. 14

  1. Rosa and Marc

    Okay, so on the left 10-6=4
    On the right: 28-24=4
    Middle, 24-10 = 14
    14 = Geography Quiz #14!!!!
    is that it? ;)

    Reply
  2. Fagstein Post author

    You’ll find out on Monday if nobody comes up with it by then.

    Another hint: It’s among the most visible of Montreal’s landmarks. (Or perhaps it’s “land”marks?)

    Reply
  3. Tim

    Okay, I’m no closer to solving this, and there’s only 24 hours to go. Therefore, I disclose to my fellow readers those thoughts I have, with the facts as they’re presented to us. If this can inspire someone to come up with the correct answer, so be it — better someone else get the credit than no one at all.

    “6, 10, 24, 28: What do these numbers indicate?”

    Rhyming (music? culture?) Maybe non-sequitur

    You have to look left and right for the answer.

    Something broad. A street?

    “Look at a map of Montreal. You can’t miss it.”

    “It” singular, suggests one item or a collection of similar items. Parks and bridges don’t match the pattern.
    Something at least tens of metres in size to be significant enough to be captured on any generalized map. Not a simple monument or statue.
    To not miss it when looking at a map, it must be big, central, both.

    “It’s among the most visible of Montreal’s landmarks. (Or perhaps it’s “land”marks?)”

    Obviously the most visible parcel of land is Mount Royal (big, central), also a touristic landmark. Other geological features that reveal themselves (directly or not) on a map: the St-Jacques escarpment, Longue Pointe.
    Possibly “land” connotation in its name (Terre des Hommes?)
    Alternatively something on land visible from water (Old Port? Jacques-Cartier Bridge? Map from Port Authority didn’t reveal anything to me, buoys, quays or lighthouses.)

    Other thoughts

    The belvedere.
    Distances of the paths on Mount Royal.

    Reply
  4. Tim

    You got us good on that one. I thought to look from the water, but not from the air (despite using Google Earth).

    So what’s up this week? Don’t have mercy on us, keep the tough ones coming.

    Reply

Leave a Reply