Posted in Montreal, Opinion, Public transit

Nuns’ Island hates public transit

As if trying to find a way to sound more like elitist suburban NIMBY snobs, residents at the southern tip of Nuns’ Island have apparently complained to the STM that they have too much bus service. They complain about the noise and dust generated by the buses.

I know buses are loud. I hear them outside my living room window every day. But I’ve never thought to complain about them, nor have I ever experienced dust problems (do they shed?)

Perhaps the noise and dust problems in the area might be due to the fact that it’s one giant construction zone for upscale condos? The photo above is one of many new skyscraping condo buildings going up in what was once empty space near a park.

The STM, after considering numerous half-assed schemes to placate residents and needlessly inconvenience public transit users, has concluded that it’s not reducing service to the area. The article doesn’t make clear which side Claude Trudel is on, since he’s both the Verdun borough mayor and the chairperson of the STM board of directors. Let’s hope he and his constituents realize this is the best option for everyone involved.

Especially when you consider that one bus on the road can replace dozens of SUVs.

4 thoughts on “Nuns’ Island hates public transit

  1. Neath

    Nun’s Island people hate anything that reminds them they are NOT in a “piece of the country 5 minutes from downtown.” Sadly, they are surrounded by such things.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Fagstein » Nuns’ Island allergic to children, fun

  3. Jean Naimard

    Aaaah, nimbyes. Yet another reason why power should be centralized as much as possible, so nimbyes cannot have their voices heard.

    They should do like they did in the West Island: put phony blue “STM 30km/h” speed signs so whenever some dope complains, they can say “maaam, it’s impossible, the bus can’t be making too much noise, because they don’t go faster than 30 km/h; look, there’s even a speed limit sign in front of your condo”.

    (Never mind that in the West Island, some bus lines have to run at twice the speed limit to keep their schedule).

    Reply

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