Ad placement is everything

Daily Mirror, June 13, 2008

Daily Mirror, June 13, 2008

This page from London’s Daily Mirror from last year is getting passed around online as of late. A fellow editor spotted it on LiveJournal. It’s also on Reddit, which pointed directly to an image on Joey deVilla’s blog. Here’s his blog post from June, where the image originates.

The layout of the article here looks funny to me, but that’s because I work for a broadsheet instead of a tabloid. It also shows the problem when editorial and advertising put together parts of a page without seeing what the other is doing until after edition.

7 thoughts on “Ad placement is everything

  1. DAVE ID

    LOL :D Could only have been worse had been an had for wife-beater shirts.

    But I’d like to point out that In May, 2007, researchers with the Centers for Disease Control reported on rates of self-reported violence among intimate partners using data from a 2001 study. Women reported committing one-sided attacks more than twice as often as men (70% versus 29%). (http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/42/15/31-a) Sadly that’s rarely reported on. Granted men’s attacks on women are often more injurious but still.

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  2. Jean Naimard

    It is even funnier because, unlike with online ads which scan the page upon which they appear to select “proper” ads on it (you can breathe now), there is no artificial silicon intelligence to blame for the misstep, only good old natural human stupidity…

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  3. DAVE ID

    Dude, when people buy ad-space in a paper they buy a specific page AND areas. And the lower-right corner of a paper is the most expensive because it’s the first place the eyes look. They start from the lower-right and then pan to the upper-left corner before the reader begins scanning article titles, making the upper-left corner another expensive ad-space. The paper doesn’t decide to just squeeze an add in there arbitrarily.

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  4. Mr. Robertson

    I’m not too familiar with the process of designing a newspaper, but I would expect that someone would look everything over before it’s sent to the presses?

    Reply
    1. Fagstein Post author

      Usually editorial and advertising are managed separately. The only people who see both together are the prepress people who combine the two and the press workers who put the plates on the presses. They concern themselves with technical aspects of the page, not whether the two might look awkward together.

      It’s a design flaw of the system which is designed to protect editorial from advertising and vice-versa.

      Reply

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