STM rate hikes 2008-2014

$TMAs usual, the STM was late in announcing its fares for the upcoming year. (Though there were mitigating circumstances, including the appointment of a new board after the municipal election and the delays in finding out exactly how much the agency was getting from the city.)

And as usual, there are complaints that the fares are too high (even though they’re much lower than other cities) or that the STM is wasting money (executive compensation is always a favourite target, even though it represents a very small part of the budget).

But are the fare hikes unreasonable? The STM says the fare is going up 3.2% this year, which is above the rate of inflation. On the other hand, users are getting more services as a result. There are more hours of bus service, plus large capital expenditures on new metro trains that should come by the end of 2014.

The agency also announced (probably to take some pressure off the rate hike) that the timetable for the installation of wireless infrastructure in the metro would be accelerated, and that the first downtown sections of tunnel would be part of the big four’s wireless networks by the end of 2014.

Here is some quantitative data on how fares have changed since 2008. It shows that the single fare, which remains frozen at $3 for 2014, stayed below the rate of inflation. But almost every other fare was far higher than that, with some fares increasing more than 30% since 2008.

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Change 2008-2014
Monthly CAM (regular) $66.25 (+1.9%) $68.50 (+3.4%) $70 (+2.2%) $72.75 (+3.9%) $75.50 (+3.8%) $77 (+2.0%) $79.50 (+3.2%) +20%
Monthly CAM (reduced) $36 (+2.9%) $37 (+2.8%) $38.75 (+4.7%) $41 (+5.8%) $43.75 (+6.7%) $45 (+2.9%) $47.25 (+5%) +31.3%
Four-month CAM (reduced fare only) N/A N/A $148 ($37/ month) $155 ($38.75/ month) (+4.7%) $164 ($41/ month) (+5.8%) $175 ($43.75/ month)(+6.7%) $180 ($45/ month) (+2.9%) +21.6% (2010-14)
Weekly CAM (regular) $19.25 (+1.3%) $20 (+3.9%) $20.50 (+2.5%) $22 (+2.5%) $23.50 (+6.8%) $23.75 (+1.0%) $24.50 (+3.2%) +27.3%
Weekly CAM (reduced) $11 (+2.3%) $11.25 (+2.3%) $11.50 (+2.2%) $12.75 (+10.9%) $13.75 (+7.8%) $14 (+1.8%) $14.75 (+5.4%) +34.1%
Three-day tourist pass $17 (unch.) $17 (unch.) $14 (-17.6%) $16 (+14.3%) $16 (unch.) $18 (+12.5%) $18 (unch.) +5.9%
24-hour tourist pass
(Also used as 747 fare)
$9 (unch.) $9 (unch.) $7 (-22.2%) $8 (+14.3%) $8 (unch.) $9 (+12.5%) $10 (+11.1%) +11.1%
Evening pass (6pm-5am) N/A N/A N/A $4 $4 (unch.) $4 (unch.) $5 (+25%) +25% (2011-14)
Weekend pass N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A $12 $13 (+8.3%) +8.3% (2013-14)
10 trips (Opus card only) (regular) N/A $20 $21 ($2.10/ trip) (+5%) $22.50 ($2.25/ trip) (+7.1%) $24 ($2.40/ trip) (+6.7%) $24.50 (+2.1%) $25.50 (+4.1%) +27.5% (2009-14)
10 trips (Opus card only) (reduced) N/A $10.75 ($1.08/ trip) $12 ($1.20/ trip) (+11.6%) $13 ($1.30/ trip) (+8.3%) $14 ($1.40/ trip) (+7.7%) $14.50 (+3.6%) $14.75 (+1.7%) +37.2% (2009-14)
Two trips (regular) N/A N/A N/A $5.50 ($2.75/trip) $5.50 (unch.) $5.50 (unch.) $5.50 (unch.) None (2011-13)
Two trips (reduced) N/A N/A N/A $3.50 ($1.75/trip) $3.50 (unch.) $3.50 (unch.) $3.50 (unch.) None (2011-13)
Single fare (regular) $2.75 (unch.) $2.75 (unch.) $2.75 (unch.) $3 (+9.1%) $3 (unch.) $3 (unch.) $3 (unch.) +9.1%
Single fare (reduced) $1.75 (unch.) $1.75 (unch.) $1.75 (unch.) $2 (+14.3%) $2 (unch.) $2 (unch.) $2 (unch.) +14.3%
Consumer price index for Montreal (previous year) 2.0% 2.1% 0.8% 1.1% 2.8% 2.0% 0.6% (Nov.) +11.7% (2008-13)

23 thoughts on “STM rate hikes 2008-2014

  1. Zeke

    Howdy!

    I would have imagined that those ” large capital expenditures” had/have been pro-rated over many years since the contract was signed. But as you bring it up, it would be interesting to know the dates on the checks for the new cars.

    Is it like Amazon.com and they’ve paid for them already and are awaiting delivery? Or is it more like IGA and they are only paying once they actually get to bring one home? Or is it like Honda Centre Ville and they are paying a little but each week? And if so, when did/do they start paying? And how many weeks do they have to pay? Or is it some other payment plan?

    Reply
    1. Fagstein Post author

      To be fair, the provincial government is actually paying 75% of the cost of the new metro cars. The STM’s capital expenditures tend to be of the less flashy kind, like its renovations of existing stations and infrastructure.

      Reply
  2. John

    So, if I lived in a booming city such as New York or London or Toronto I would pay more for my transit. But I don’t . I live in a barely surviving city. Quit bringing up how cheap it is for me to get around. It means nothing. Montreal (and Quebec) needs a political enema like no where else on earth. And sorry, Coderre isn’t going to be any better than the last 10 losers who ran the city.

    Reply
  3. Denis H

    You do realize that the cost of living in cities such as New York, Toronto, or London is highly prohibitive, regardless of the cost of transit.

    Montreal, a “barely surviving city”?? Wow, I can’t even dignify that with a retort…

    That being said, Montreal’s administration does indeed need a good kick in the rear, and I agree Coderre isn’t the one to cure all its ails (and neither is Schnobb for the STM).

    Reply
    1. Apple IIGS

      You do realize that the cost of living in cities such as New York, Toronto, or London is highly prohibitive, regardless of the cost of transit.

      Do you realize living in cities such as New York, Toronto or London guarantees you far, far more (vastly more!) career and job opportunities? Do you realize the level of income there is vastly higher? Do you realize taxes are countless times lower? Finally, do you realize your chances of being hired for a job in those cities is based on your abilities, experience and skill, NOT what your last name is, or what religious clothing or symbols you wear?

      Montreal, a “barely surviving city”?? Wow, I can’t even dignify that with a retort…

      Wow indeed. Barely surviving is too optimistic, quite frankly it’s future is more a dying city the way things are headed. Also worth pointing out much of Montreal’s world class prestige from say, 35-40 years ago, is quickly fading away. McGill lost its standing and no longer ranks as top university in Canada. Montreal’s Treadeau has dropped from highest traffic airport in all of Canada, to 4th highest (now behind Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary). There were 10 major hotels that closed in Montreal in the last few years, several just in 2013. Job growth is up all over Canada, but down in Montreal. Infrastructure that is in critical condition, crumbling everywhere. I could go on and on for pages of Montreal’s decline, but I’ll skill saying the reason why because that’s a whole other can of worms.

      Back on topic, I wouldn’t mind paying more for STM services if the services improved. Every year I hear about more buses, keeping schedules and more frequent trains, but I somehow that never materializes. Hearing about metro cars mishaps like the doors not closing while the train is in motion (and it happening several times per year!) does not make me encouraged.

      Sorry to be negative, but I just hate hearing about transit price hikes every year and promises that keep getting broken.

      ps – Also pisses me off that tonight, on New Year’s Eve, almost every transit system in North America offers extended service past midnight (often free!) to alleviate the possibility of drunk drivers being on the road, but the STM? Nope, shut the system down at midnight and charge full fare. Good going, Montreal…

      Reply
      1. Dilbert

        You are correct sir. The polish on Montreal has been going off for about 40 years now, the combined effects of the Olympic disaster (financial) and the Election of the PQ (and all the never-endums that have come with it) have hurt Montreal’s standing in the world.

        The last few years have been really telling. Montreal was sort of able to hold it together when the exchange rate to the US dollar was such that anywhere in Canada was often more cost efficient than operating directly in the US, so plenty of business was done from here. When the loonie reached parity with the US dollar, all of that went away as well. Quebec overall has gotten a double kick in the groin because now not only is our labor too expensive (high minimum wage) but our tax levels for everyone is higher than almost any other place in North America. Tack in the language issues, the requirement to operate in French if you are over a certain number of people, and it’s no wonder Montreal isn’t a business destination anymore.

        Population tells a big part of the deal too – while Montreal’s population is up (apparently in part because of the mergers playing with the numbers), The greater montreal area is now just about half as populous as the Great Toronto area… a complete reversal for two cities who were neck and neck in the past.

        The results are there, as you say. Crumbling infrastructure, corruption, tourism on the wane, and a series of poor political masters who seemed more intent on remaking the city into an inaccessible, un-enjoyable place to live and work. They have worked hard since the late 60s to drive people out of the core to the suburbs, and only recently have woken up to the fact that the people who work here don’t want to live here.

        Public transit is a perfect example of why it fails: construction projects are slow, the often are poorly planned, and bring services either to areas that are already well served or that will not add many users to the system. It’s mind numbing to think that to this day, AMT does not have control over the train lines that it operates on, and as such, are subjects to the whims of private companies to get the chance to run their trains. The metro has run trains for more than a decade that have no actual spare parts available, and the reliability of the system as a result has faltered.

        We should also not forget that both on the south shore and in Laval, the local governments and developers are working to create new “downtown” areas, which over time will offer valid alternatives for people who use to come into the city. With the upcoming rebuilding of the Turcot interchange into a road that handles less traffic, the re-do of the Champlain bridge, and so on) you can expect access to the downtown core to be even harder, and the pull of relocation for companies to areas outside of the core more attractive.

        Montreal’s slide shows little chance of changing direction. The core issues will not go away, the infrastructure issues can only be resolved with more money, which means more taxes for the citizens. It’s a never ending cycle that won’t fix itself any time soon, and is pretty self-destructive. As the costs to be in the city rise, it drives more people out of the city, which in turn puts pressure on infrastructure and public transit, which both cost… you only get off that bad cycle when you stop throwing money at stupid things and get with the program.

        Reply
        1. Apple IIGS

          All I can say is, Montreal is destined to become the next Detroit.

          Unless there is an immediate turn-around, and I see absolutely no indication or hope of one, this WILL happen. And we’re not talking decades from now, this is coming in the very near future.

          It’s worth mention Montreal has the oldest (still-in-use) subway rolling stock in North America, dating back to the early 1960’s. The STM claims it’s still safe, but I’d question that when doors frequently fail to close while the train is in motion, a girl recently died falling between two cars (no safety barrier; a modern train would have that feature), trains that have decoupled in the tunnel, constant breakdowns, fires, etc. Replacement trains (which the STM is grossly overpaying for, over a political stunt by the Liberals) are still a year away, and will take something like 5 years to complete. No air conditioning on these trains either, wonderful.

          Reply
          1. Fagstein Post author

            All I can say is, Montreal is destined to become the next Detroit.

            Let’s not get ridiculous here. Detroit’s financial problems are related to a declining auto manufacturing sector. There’s no indication that anything similar is happening in Montreal, which has a much more diversified economy, much of it related to sectors like biotechnology and aerospace that aren’t going anywhere.

            Montreal has serious economic issues, but there’s no evidence of economic collapse here.

            No air conditioning on these trains either, wonderful.

            Air conditioning would just transfer heat to the tunnels. To make it work, the entire system would need to be air conditioned. And that would be very, very expensive for the two or three weeks a year when it’s so hot as to be uncomfortable in the metro trains.

            Instead, the STM is working on increasing air circulation in the system, which would allow heat to escape faster in the summer. The new metro cars would also have better on-board circulation and generate less heat by themselves.

            Reply
            1. Apple IIGS

              Let’s not get ridiculous here. Detroit’s financial problems are related to a declining auto manufacturing sector. There’s no indication that anything similar is happening in Montreal, which has a much more diversified economy, much of it related to sectors like biotechnology and aerospace that aren’t going anywhere

              Montreal has serious economic issues, but there’s no evidence of economic collapse here.

              I think you’re missing the bigger picture. It is not just one industry sector at risk in Montreal, it’s virtually all of them. There is no incentive to set up new business operations in Montreal, and existing ones are already looking to leave, many have recently. Re-read some of what Dilbert wrote above to understand why.

              No one with any sane business sense wants to operate in Quebec the way things are. Add to that restrictive laws in language and now even stripping away basic human rights in terms of religion expression, dress or practice. Quebec almost prides itself on making it self the most business UNfriendly region in North America.

              Let me say this, just a mere 40 years ago Montreal was THE economic engine of Canada, it’s industrial capital. Now that’s shifted to Toronto, and Quebec has gone from one of the richest provinces in the country to the *poorest*. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out why, and that same force (read: separatist governments) is continuing to destroy what’s left as we speak.

              Even though neither has passed yet, you cannot even imagine the permanent damage Bills 14 and Bill 60 have done to the reputation of Quebec. Basically its rained poisoned on business here.

              And I also see nothing to stop the rampant corruption at ever level in this province. That continue cycle of corruption cannot sustain itself forever, at some point quite soon there will be nothing left for it to feed on. Oh, and Quebec is now the 4th most indebted region on planet Earth and if not for transfer payments coming from the other provinces, would literally collapse overnight. Forget Detroit, let’s call Quebec the next Greece. Even with those transfer payments, Quebec and Montreal with it, are headed for economic collapse.

              [blockquote] Air conditioning would just transfer heat to the tunnels. To make it work, the entire system would need to be air conditioned. And that would be very, very expensive for the two or three weeks a year when it’s so hot as to be uncomfortable in the metro trains.[/blockquote] I don’t buy that, it’s a convenient excuse. Toronto, New York and other major cities are able to air condition their subway cars AND buses. Why is it impossible only in Montreal?

              I think it would be quite cost effective (but again, corruption in Quebec would prevent that likely) and increase ridership if it transit were made comfortable to ride. Our subway cars hit temperatures up to a sweltering 40 C during the summer, with stagnant air to boot. It’s bad enough I’ve actually taken to biking to work and around the city except in the winter months. Not even a cost issue, it’s just that unbearable to ride at any ticket price.

              Instead, the STM is working on increasing air circulation in the system, which would allow heat to escape faster in the summer. The new metro cars would also have better on-board circulation and generate less heat by themselves.

              If that method of cooling works so well, why haven’t other cities followed this path? I’ll tell you why, because it would still be incredibly intolerable to ride public transit without cooling.

              Reply
              1. Fagstein Post author

                No one with any sane business sense wants to operate in Quebec the way things are.

                So all the businesses that operate here are insane?

                Add to that restrictive laws in language and now even stripping away basic human rights in terms of religion expression, dress or practice. Quebec almost prides itself on making it self the most business UNfriendly region in North America.

                The controversial aspects of the Quebec values charter restrict appearance in the public service. They have nothing to do with the private sector. Language is obviously an issue, but has been for decades, and in any case no large company can operate in Quebec without doing so in French.

                And I also see nothing to stop the rampant corruption at ever level in this province.

                I see plenty of stuff being done to stop corruption at every level in this province. We’ve got a commission looking into it, a specialized task force policing it, and new laws regulating the awarding of construction contracts – laws that are so strict they’re causing significant delays to the awarding of those contracts.

                Oh, and Quebec is now the 4th most indebted region on planet Earth and if not for transfer payments coming from the other provinces, would literally collapse overnight. Forget Detroit, let’s call Quebec the next Greece.

                Quebec’s debt-to-GDP ratio is a bit above 50% (about on par with scandinavian countries, and below the world average). Greece’s is 160%.

                Toronto, New York and other major cities are able to air condition their subway cars AND buses. Why is it impossible only in Montreal?

                It’s not impossible. Just expensive. The fact that Toronto and New York run their subways above and below ground has a bit to do with it.

                If that method of cooling works so well, why haven’t other cities followed this path?

                You mean fans blowing air around? I’m pretty sure air circulation is used in just about every transit system in the world, not to mention elevators, office buildings, airplanes and anything else that has people in it. It doesn’t replace air conditioning, but it helps to increase passenger comfort.

              2. Dilbert

                “Quebec’s debt-to-GDP ratio is a bit above 50% (about on par with scandinavian countries, and below the world average). Greece’s is 160%.”

                Somewhat dishonest number, because that is net the transfer payments that prop up the province. The debt would be increasing by about 10% more every year without it, without transfer payments since 2005 Quebec’s debt would be more than 50% higher, or something like 80% GDP and would be continuing to grow annually until the ship ran aground.

                Quebec debt has been piling up rapidly for the last 20 years, and that in the face of crumbling infrastructure and insanely high tax rates tells a bad story.

          2. Marc

            All I can say is, Montreal is destined to become the next Detroit.
            Unless there is an immediate turn-around, and I see absolutely no indication or hope of one, this WILL happen.

            Pure conjecture; and the Detroit comparison is nonsense of the highest order.

            And we’re not talking decades from now, this is coming in the very near future

            Not you or anyone else can predict the future.

            but I’d question that when doors frequently fail to close while the train is in motion[…] trains that have decoupled in the tunnel, constant breakdowns, fires, etc

            And that kind of stuff never, ever happens on subways in other cities, right?

            a girl recently died falling between two cars (no safety barrier; a modern train would have that feature)

            That has more to do with people becoming more and more braindead because of smartphones/gadgets. No different than those who walk straight into oncoming traffic with their face straight down at the phone because they can’t wait 14 seconds to send that totally non-urgent text message.

            Reply
          3. Dilbert

            I agree with Steve here, I don’t think Montreal is doomed to a Detroit death spiral, rather it’s more like and endless grinding down to being more of a Philly or perhaps a Cleveland or something (no Cleavland Steamer jokes, please!). You know, cities with lots of working class, lots of gritty neighborhoods, plenty of crime, gangs, and such. It won’t collapse, but under the current situation, it’s hard to see a turn.

            The reality is with Montreal has gone from being one of the lowest cost places to do business (in part because of exchange rates and such) to one of the highest cost locations.

            The high taxes and low service levels of Quebec in general and Montreal in particular will continue, as the unions still have a strong hold on much of what is done in Quebec, leading to high costs, low productivity, and low quality work. The financial stress means that for the last few decades, much of Montreal’s road repairs have been band air messures, which has lead to roads crumbling, concrete falling, and water mains breaking regularly. There is little chance of a change of direction for Montreal.

            The issues of public transit in Montreal are a sign of the troubles. Spend a lot of money on projects (such as the blue line extension) and ignore the more pressing realities. If Montreal wants to become a public commuter system city and not a car city, then they need to look at where the cars come from and address the issues. Wasting money so that people already well served and taking public transit can save a few minutes on a journey is insanity, a political choice made that dooms Montreal to another decade of public transit failing to meet the true needs.

            Reply
  4. Marc

    And sorry, Coderre isn’t going to be any better than the last 10 losers who ran the city.

    You’re falsely assuming that it’s the mayor who runs the city. Wrong. The mayor is a figure head. The city is run (mostly) by the top-level, senior fonctionnaires. The balance is run the by the mob. Same thing for the STM.

    Reply
  5. Dilbert

    The increases of course are nowhere in keeping with the true costs of operating the system, income from rider fares is less than half of the budget to run the place, which is truly a sad situation. Meanwhile, higher wage earners continue to pay the vast majority of public transit costs.

    It’s too bad that there isn’t at least an equal amount of budget contraction on the other side to try to get the numbers to jive more. It’s hard to imagine that Montreal pays caviar prices for KD services.

    Reply
    1. Fagstein Post author

      income from rider fares is less than half of the budget to run the place, which is truly a sad situation.

      I think a lot of people would disagree with you there. Frankly, I think it’s neither sad nor happy. It reflects a policy difference whereby here there’s more subsidization for public transit in Quebec.

      Reply
      1. Dilbert

        Yes, and at the same time, Quebec people are also very strong to bitch about paying too high taxes, too high property taxes, too high gas taxes, and too high everything else.

        At some point, public transit will have to do what the post office is having to do now, who are being forced to make a radical change because they cannot continue in their current path. While Canadians generally are willing to be taxed to support such things, it has really reached the breaking point for many, where it is just no longer sustainable in the long run.

        My guess is that for the forseeable future, you will see increases in monthly passes that far exceed the rate of inflation, as governments are pretty pinched these days and can’t keep shoveling money blindly into the abyss.

        Reply
  6. Emily Gray

    I don’t mind if they increase the fares a little bit as long as they don’t cut the service!! (Which is being talked about.)

    Although I’m not thrilled at fare hikes, I’d rather pay a little more and have the STM keep the service they have now, rather than have to pay more AND have service cut!

    Reply
  7. Apple IIGS

    So all the businesses that operate here are insane?

    The businesses that operate here have ALREADY been here for years, in some cases
    decades (much like a majority of the citizens). Now despite being rooted, I can tell
    you a great many of them are currently looking to leave this province, and many
    already have. There’s an interesting documentary I invite you to watch on Montreal CTV
    News called “Quitting Quebec”. It’s about a new wave of companies (and people) leaving
    this province since the Parti Quebecois was re-elected in 2012.

    As for businesses and companies looking to move INTO Quebec? You’d be hard press to
    find some, unless they’ve been granted enormous tax breaks incentives by the
    government (really the only way to attract any company into this province now).
    Advantages for companies coming to this province are few to none, it’s just negatives
    from a business perspective. So yes, any company looking to move into Quebec IS
    insane, or very short sighted and not business savvy to say the least.

    The controversial aspects of the Quebec values charter restrict appearance
    in the public service. They have nothing to do with the private sector.

    Controversial aspects? Controversial?! My god man, are you telling me you think there
    are parts of the Quebec Charter of Values that are acceptable then? Are you just
    trying to play devil’s advocate, or are you really that naive about the so-called
    “charter” that you think of it as just another ‘ol bill or sets of rules and
    restrictions you might see elsewhere in Canada or the US?

    It has **EVERYTHING** to do with the private sector. Also worth noting, if you’re a
    private contractor working for the government, these so-called laws do apply to you
    and your workers. Even someone sweeping the floor.
    Bill 14 is another problematic bit for business, particularly since parts of it were
    sneaked into the Quebec Charter of Values recently. To search and seize “offending”
    materials (i.e. English) from a business in a raid like fashion? To fine and prosecute
    companies without notification or trial?

    no large company can operate in Quebec without doing so in
    French.

    Considering the majority of businesses operating on planet Earth do so in ENGLISH, not
    any other language, how does this help attract businesses into Quebec? Oh right, it
    doesn’t, it just puts Quebec into an isolated bubble that cuts it off from the rest of
    the world. No other country in the free world has such a ridiculous restriction,
    which as you may or may not know, affects that company’s ability to prosper and
    profit. THE bottom line.

    I see plenty of stuff being done to stop corruption at every level in this
    province. We’ve got a commission looking into it, a specialized task force policing
    it, and new laws regulating the awarding of construction contracts – laws that are so
    strict they’re causing significant delays to the awarding of those
    contracts.

    And you honestly think things are going to change based on that? Corruption is so
    deeply imbedding into the lifestyle of citizens, politicians, (unionized) workers and
    government here, you’d be pretty naive to think the above is going to put an end to it
    for good.

    Quebec’s debt-to-GDP ratio is a bit above 50% (about on par with
    scandinavian countries, and below the world average). Greece’s is 160%.

    Did you register what I said, Quebec is the 4th most indebted region in **the world**.
    Not Canada, not North America, the entire WORLD.

    Quebec keeps spending more than it has, while endlessly borrowing (and generally
    wasting it), while doing nothing to turn this trend around. I’d compare Quebec to an
    irresponsible adult, who racks up credit card debt into the hundreds of thousands,
    while sitting on their ass and making their parents (i.e. Canada) make all the
    payments. The debt keeps rising out of control, so the parent is eventually going to
    get fed up or go broke themselves. It cannot go on indefinitely.
    Quebec has dug itself into a serious hole and just keeps digging deeper.

    http://www.iedm.org/27-quebec-debt-clock

    It’s not impossible. Just expensive. The fact that Toronto and New York run
    their subways above and below ground has a bit to do with it.

    If they calculate it the way they shopped for new metro cars (i.e. baring any outside
    bidders for the contract, and then paying more than TWICE the cost for cars for no
    other reason than trying to win votes in a region) than yeah, I’ll bet air condition
    would be considered “expensive”. If Montreal’s subway system were in Toronto or any
    other city in the world, I can assure you air conditioned trains COULD and WOULD be
    done at a reasonable and affordable cost.

    Yes, Montreal is all underground, but there are ways to pump that hot air out with
    some well thought out planning and engineering. Montreal will not, however, because
    the STM is short sighted, greedy and corrupt. I find it funny though that the DRIVER
    cabin on these trains will be air conditioned, just not passengers. Huh? Any person
    with half a brain knows that passenger comfort will encourage ridership, and therefore
    boost income in the long term. It’s just common business sense.

    You mean fans blowing air around? I’m pretty sure air circulation is used
    in just about every transit system in the world, not to mention elevators, office
    buildings, airplanes and anything else that has people in it. It doesn’t replace air
    conditioning, but it helps to increase passenger comfort.

    Ventilation isn’t a luxury, it is a necessity. People do need air to breath, ya think?
    :) Unless they have ventilation blowing air around in the cars to the point your hat
    is blown off, it’s just going to be the same as now….stirring all that hot
    uncomfortable air around. There’s a reason people use air conditioners instead of just
    fans in the summer.

    Reply
  8. A

    Children get their opuses as they get to high school, more and more people need the STM, we depend on them, and while the price increase may seem reasonable, what have they done with it? They spend 125K$ to change the name of a metro station instead of improving the temperature control and fixing the escalators in certain places.
    I use Villa Maria to get to my community centre and it took them over a month to fix their upper level escalator. Saint Michel has multiple out of order escalators for a larger amount of time and it’s a terminus stop. It needed at least one of their escalators fixed.
    “Instead of dealing with the problems at this big station, we’ll change the name of a station with all this extra money.”

    As if hiring people to print and replace the metro maps to change a name was much simpler, efficient and cheaper than hiring a couple of mechanics who could fix an ongoing problem in a couple of days.

    Reply

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