Media News Digest: La Presse Olympics editions, new Gazette columnists, L.A. Times sold

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3 thoughts on “Media News Digest: La Presse Olympics editions, new Gazette columnists, L.A. Times sold

  1. dilbert

    We all know how “positive” newspaper strikes are. The truth is that without a radical redo, news gathering to print on dead trees is about as dead as the trees. The readership is aging and dying off, and younger people generally don’t have the interest. So any contract that tries to maintain a version of the status quo is a step backwards.

    Bell’s concern about superbowl ratings appears to be unfounded. 4.4 million is a pretty darn good number for any event, they just need to work to assure that they can have a deal with the NFL that makes sense at those levels. Bell should have no problem bringing in top ad dollars for the game itself – it’s just a question of what they pay for the Canadian rights withiout simsub to line their pockets.

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  2. Jim

    I work in a place with 40 English speaking workers. Not a single one of them subscribes to the Gazette, or any other paper. Not one. No one cares about it at all, they don’t look at it on the web or pick up a free copy in the Metro. So, go on strike. No one would care. Sorry but the truth hurts.

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    1. Dorothy

      Can I ask you something?
      Do they read another print/online news publication? If not, how do they stay informed? And by informed, I don’t mean celebrity gossip or the latest hot-spot restaurant.
      I’m talking about political analysis, op-eds written from opposite ends of the political spectrum, stories on what a pullout from NAFTA will do to Canada’s economy.
      I was reading the old Montreal Star when I was in grade school, and I eagerly anticipated the terrific pieces in the magazines that came with the Saturday Star and Gazette (Weekend and Canadian). It’s not relevant whether print or online is the source of information but how are current (and future) voters informing themselves?

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