Media News Digest: NNA noms, Attraction selling radio stations, feds probe Postmedia-Torstar conspiracy

News about news

At the CRTC

  • The commission has published the application for the acquisition of Historia and Séries+ by Bell Media. The channels, currently owned by Corus, are valued at $200 million, which is less than the $274 million it was valued at in 2013 when Bell sold Astral’s half to Corus. Bell says the main reason for the drop is the loss of regulatory protections that older specialty channels got. Though these are channels Bell sold off in order to get the CRTC to accept the acquisition of Astral Media, Bell says even with these channels it would have a smaller French-language viewing share (22.5%) and subscription revenue share (56%) than it did after the acquisition. We’ll see how Quebecor feels about that.

TV & video

Radio

Print

Online

  • Sportsnet tried a new thing this week, a Twitter-based streaming program called Ice Surfing, which featured live look-ins on NHL and OHL games (the latter being broadcast by Rogers TV), as well as chats with Sportsnet personalities. A bit similar to NHL on the Fly from the old NHL Network. The program, which ended at 10pm ET, included some check-ins with the Toronto-Nashville and Ottawa-Edmonton games, which were regional and would normally be blacked out. But there was a lot of long segments in which there was no live action, despite no shortage of NHL activity.
  • There’s child porn in the Bitcoin blockchain.

Other

News about people

Obituaries

Jobs

5 thoughts on “Media News Digest: NNA noms, Attraction selling radio stations, feds probe Postmedia-Torstar conspiracy

  1. dilbert

    “The court documents show that the agreement between the companies included a non-compete clause, that it listed job losses only at the papers that were going to be shut down, and that at least one employee was informed by Postmedia that he was being laid off, even though Torstar was acquiring his newspaper.”

    I think that the paper owners are playing games to avoid liability, and to have the ability to make changes as a “new owner”. I do personally think it was very well organized and orchestrated to make it easy for each player to close many of the papers as “duplicated” or “no two in the same market”.

    Working together to eliminate competition is an extremely anit-competitive move. However, the newspaper companies are in true deep sh-t at this point, and they are likely to do anything and everything they can do to live a little longer before facing the inevitable.

    Reply
  2. Alex

    Google doesn’t need to spend any money on this.There’s plenty of good journalism out there. You just have to know where to go to find it. That’s been my experience.

    Reply
  3. Alex

    Question about the CRTC. I have a Smart TV. All the best apps come from the USA but I can’t access any of them because I’m not in the ‘right location’. It’s frustrating as it is baffling. Is this the CRTC’s work?

    Reply
    1. Fagstein Post author

      I have a Smart TV. All the best apps come from the USA but I can’t access any of them because I’m not in the ‘right location’. It’s frustrating as it is baffling. Is this the CRTC’s work?

      No. Regional restrictions come out of licensing deals between content owners and distributors, which are usually sold for each country separately. The CRTC doesn’t regulate this.

      Reply

Leave a Reply