Tag Archives: newspaper front pages

Posted in In the news, Media

Jack Layton front pages

It didn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out what would make the front pages of the papers on Tuesday. Not only was Jack Layton a larger-than-life figure, and the first leader of the opposition to die in office since Wilfrid Laurier in 1919 (at least, that’s what Wikipedia says), but he conveniently died early on a weekday morning, giving newspaper editors a full working day to decide how they would honour him on their front pages.

The Globe and Mail (above) got a lot of buzz on Twitter, but it wasn’t the only one to use a sketch of Layton, and certainly not the only one to quote from the end of his letter to Canadians, as you’ll see below. Different papers chose different file photos, but the headlines of his obituary were written by Layton himself. (Maybe with some help from a talented speechwriter.)

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Posted in In the news, Media

Something about history and a mountain and changing…

Some other Canadian Page Ones can be found at Newseum’s site, which also has a special video on Obama-related newspaper front pages (if you can watch it, the site is very slow).

Among my recommendations for U.S. covers:

The links are now all old, but the covers have been archived here.

Favourite headline, only because nobody else used it: “Tide of hope“, from the St. Petersburg Times.

Posted in In the news, Media, Opinion

Bhutto assassination: Why is it big news?

Major newspapers around the world and in Montreal gave huge play to the assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.

Montreal front pages - Dec. 28, 2007

Which of these reasons best describes the near-unanimous decision to put this on front pages?

  1. The news media is starting to seriously pay attention to international news, giving it the importance it deserves.
  2. The news media hasn’t changed. The assassination of a top political figure is an unusual and important story.
  3. The news media is desperate for a real news story in the otherwise dead year-in-review banked-feature time around Christmas and New Years.
  4. She’s hot.